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>> susie: good evening everyone. i'm susie gharib. a dire warning from moody's to u.s. lawmakers: avert the fiscal cliff, or risk a credit downgrade. >> tom: i'm tom hudson. we're going global with legendary investor mark mobius, franklin templeton's top strategist on the state of emerging markets now. >> susie: and picture this: the u.s. is just a few years away from being the world's top oil producer, and self-sufficient. we'll tell you who's making that prediction, and investment strategies for your portfolio. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: the u.s.'s top-notch credit rating is at risk. that's the warning today from moody's investor's service. the ratings agency told u.s. lawmakers that when it comes to the fiscal cliff, the time to act is now, not next year. moody's said if action on averting the cliff is delayed until 2013, it might downgrade the stellar credit rating on u.s. debt. right now moody's has a negative outlook on the u.s. economy. worries about a fiscal freefall, kept wall street stocks in check: the dow and nasdaq fell a fraction, while the
spill in u.s. history. in its guilty plea, b.p. said it deeply regrets the loss of life and almost five million barrels of oil that into the gulf. darren gersh reports. >> reporter: justice department officials hope today's settlement and criminal pleas will bring justice to the families of the men who died when the "deepwater horizon" exploded. >> perhaps the greatest tragedy is that the deaths of the 11 men on board the "deepwater horizon" could have been avoided. the explosion of the rig was a disaster that resulted from b.p.'s culture of privileging profit over prudence. >> reporter: b.p. has agreed to plead guilty to 11 counts of felony manslaughter and one felony count of lying to congress. in addition, two b.p. supervisors on the deepwater rig have been charged with 23 counts of manslaughter. another b.p. executive was charged with lying to congress. b.p. will also pay a record- setting $4 billion in criminal fines and penalties. thrown in with the criminal charges is a civil settlement with the securities and exchange commission. b.p. will pay more than half a billion dollars to
years after a massive oil spill at daily inched the u.s. coast. --deluged the u.s. coast. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. there are real concerns that the conflict between palestinian militants in gaza and israel could spark a wider conflict in the region. air raid fire sounded in the israeli city of tel aviv as rockets were fired towards it. the assaults underlines the rising tension. >> tonight, sirens sounding across tel aviv. the commercial capital and most populous city now a target for the rockets being fired by militants -- militants in gaza. people to cover bread they could. there were no casualties -- people took cover where they could. there were no casualties. >> i saw a flash of light. 2 kilometers in the direction of the seat. the rocket landed in the seat. >> targeting tel aviv marks a significant escalation of this growing conflict. the body of the man held responsible by his it -- by israel for launching hundreds of rockets from gauze that. -- gaza. at his funeral in gaza city, the military commander was carried to the streets
on an oil rig in the gulf of mexico released one of the worst oil spills in u.s. history. the obama administration announced is putting a temporary stop on new federal contracts with bp. for more on the financial impact, i spoke with adam brooks. and what does this actually need for bp? >> it means they still have not been forgiven for the explosion in the deep water rights in that killed 11 people and pumped millions of gallons of oil into the gulf of mexico in 2010. it means that in addition to $4.5 billion in fines that they have agreed to pay, a leading criminal charges, bp will now not -- pleading guilty to criminal charges, bp will now not in -- get any new business in the u.s. >> how much business does vp actually have with the u.s. government at the moment? >> most people point to its contract that it has today, $1.4 billion in fuel that it sold to the u.s. last year. bp employs 23,000 people here and has billions of dollars in investments. it was hinting that it was not in america's interest to allow bp's business here to go under. another important thing, they have new dri
to washington-- if the u.s. goes over the fiscal cliff, it would push the economy into a recession. and late today, a top credit rating agency puts the odds of going off the cliff at 15%. plus, how g.o.p. economic policies could change as election day demographics change. that and more tonight on nbr! the u.s. economy would be driven into recession next year if the fiscal cliff is not solved in time. that's the warning again today from the congressional budget office. and the standard and poor's ratings agency said there's an increasing chance we will go over that cliff of tax increases and spending cuts. it puts the odds at 15%. still, s&p is optimistic about a solution, saying "the most likely scenario, in our view, is that policymakers reach sufficient political compromise in time to avoid most, if not all, potential economic effects of the cliff." both s&p and the congressional budget office warned unemployment would go over 9% by the end of next year if the cliff is triggered. those s&p comments hit the market in the last 30 minutes of trading, extending yesterday's sharp losses. the do
classes this year. >> tom: the u.s. economy was hotter than first thought this summer. in the newest data on the gross domestic product, the economy grew in the third quarter at its fastest pace of the year. the revised report said the economy grew at a 2.7% clip. that's well above the previously reported 2% growth. adding fuel was restocking inventories, which is not expected to continue. higher federal government spending and stronger u.s. exports also helped. the impact super-storm sandy has had on the job market seems to be dissipating. 23,000 fewer americans filed for first-time unemployment benefits during thanksgiving week compared to a week earlier. the total was 393,000. it had jumped to over 400,000 in the weeks following the storm. still, we saw just modest gains on wall street today-- the dow rose 36 points, the nasdaq was up 20, and the s&p 500 added six. >> tom: the roster of companies announcing special one-time paydays for their shareholders continued growing today. taxes on stock dividends are currently set at 15%. but with no deal on the fiscal cliff, dividends will be t
to preventing the u.s. economy from falling off the fiscal cliff. while washington struggles on a fiscal cliff deal, what should you do about your portfolio? jeff applegate has some answers. he's chief investment officer at morgan stanley smith barney. and home depot hammers home strong gains and lays the foundation for a strong quarter ahead. that and more tonight on "n.b.r." it was another day of cliff- watching here on wall street today. investors and traders are waiting to hear what happens at an important white house meeting on friday between president obama and congressional leaders. they will be talking about ways to solve the so-called "fiscal cliff" dilemma. investors appear cautious about making any big moves until they know whether the cliff will trigger increases in capital gains and dividend taxes. the dow fell almost 59 points, the nasdaq lost 20, and the s&p was down five. meanwhile, in washington, congress returned to work for the first time since september. lawmakers face a long "to-do list," and getting a deal on that fiscal cliff is right at the top. darren gersh reports. >>
history of debt in the u.s.; and h.i.v. infections in young people. but first, the other news of the day, here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: wall street lost ground today over renewed concerns that deficit talks in washington are not making progress. the dow jones industrial average was down 89 points to close at 12,878. the nasdaq fell nine points to close below 2968. earlier, there were more signs of a recovery home prices went up in most major u.s. cities by 3% in september compared to a year ago. america's ambassador to the u.n. failed to mollify senate critics today on the attack at the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. susan rice met with republican senators who've criticized her for saying-- five days after the attack-- that anti-american protests were to blame. in fact, u.s. officials already knew it was a terrorist strike. today, rice blamed faulty intelligence. but senator lindsey graham said he was unimpressed. bottom line, i'm more disturbed now than i was before that the 16 september explanation about how four americans died in benghazi libya by ambassador rice i thin
recognition that the palestinians were seeking. israel and the u.s. were opposed. it could delay hopes for achieving an independent palestinian state through peace talks. u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton said the vote was unfortunate and counterproductive. >> a landmark day in and often turbulent history. jubilant palestinians to i heard there president demand what he said was their basic right to self-determination. >> the moment has arrived for the world to see clearly. enough with the settlements and occupation we are here now. >> after days of diplomacy, the majority backed palestine's bid to be recognized as a nation, but without full membership. many in a yasser arafat a square felt this was a symbolic than significant day, were the of celebration. a little -- the political activists are happy, but know that the struggle continues. >> we learned not to get our hopes up, not to get high expectations. we will wait. but we feel that we are heading in the right direction. >> israeli control over the occupied territories will not end as a result of the u.n. vote. the palestinia
the government they have to do what is right for the public. >> susie: as for what the fed can do if the u.s. heads into recession because of the fiscal cliff, bernanke says, not much. >> in the worse case scenario, where the economy goes off the broad fiscal cliff, the largest fiscal cliff, which, according the c.b.o. and our analysis, would send the u.s. economy into recession, i don't think the fed has the tools to offset that. >> susie: members of the audience agreed. >> he was very frank in saying, you know, "we can try," he essentially said, "we will try, but we don't have anything in our arsenal that comes close." >> susie: bernanke is already using the weapons in his arsenal to fix the job market, which he said today is still "unhealthy". he also repeated the fed's plan to keep interest rates super low at least into 2015. >> we will want to be sure that the recovery is established before we begin to normalize policy. we hope that such assurances will reduce uncertainty and increase confidence among households and businesses. >> susie: but bernanke gave no hints on when americans can
evening i'm susie gharib. u.s. stocks are trading again, after hurricane sandy forces an historic two-day shutdown. >> tom: wall street gets back to business, as damage and recovery estimates start to climb, plus, what it takes to restore power to millions in the northeast. >> susie: and with stocks open for trading, no surprise, home depot was the dow's standout. >> tom: lots ahead, that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: an historic day on here on wall street, after the storm of the century knocked down the financial district. us stock markets resumed operations today after two days in the dark, stocks were little changed: both the dow and the nasdaq fell 10 points, but the s&p 500 gained a fraction. trading here at the new york stock exchange opened without a hitch. the new york stock exchange opened right on time. and as new york's mayor bloomberg rang the opening bell this morning, traders were happy to be back to work. it looked like a normal day, with the buzz of activity, traders milling about. it was anything but normal no one knows that better than larry leibowitz, the
to go before the u.s. presidential election, a new jobs report is fueling arguments on the campaign trail. it seems to have something for everyone. president obama is time-outing that more jobs were -- touting that more jobs have been created than were expected. romney says the overall elm ploit rate is actually up. now startshe weekend blitz and the bbc's adam brooks has been watching the reaction for us. >> the voter in the state of ohio -- >> in 2008 we were in the middle of two wars and the worst economic crisis since the great depression. today our businesses have created nearly 5 1/2 million new jobs and this morning we learned the companies hired more workers in october than at any time in the last eight months. >> new jobs were created in america in october. 171,000 of them, many in health care, retail and business services. many more people returned to the workforce, possibly a sign of economic optimism. but still these are not numbers to excite a tired and skittish electorate. mitt romney, campaigning in wisconsin, trying to erode mr. obama's support in the midwest. he too
committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: we are just hours away from polls opening on the east coast. it could be a long night. only time will tell how this raised will turn out in history, but history is. we want to bring you a unique project from oliver stone. the two have teamed up for an unprecedented showtime series called the untold history of the united states. the show kicks off on showtime and also features his companion botook. first of preview of the untold history of the united states. >> roosevelt made his solos move yet. the stakes have rarely been higher in a presidential election, and roosevelt shows his secretary of agriculture as his running mate. wallace had been at the nerve center in sawing off the perils of the great depression, easing the way of government subsidies with farmers to stay in business by cutting back on production. wallace provided food stamps. he instituted programs for land use planning and soil conser
of led zeppelin. we talked to jimmy page about their special honor in the u.s. >>> welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. we begin with dramatic developments in the middle east. palestinian militants have fired a rocket all the way to jerusalem for the first time in decades. they have also targeted tel aviv. israel has risen but by calling up reserve troops and stepping up its bombardment of gaza. in a moment, a report from the gaza strip were there more civilian casualties today. first, we have this report from tel aviv. >> today, and the heart of israel, sirens scream for people to take cover from rocket fire. the past 24 hours have come as quite a shock. even for the million israelis living close to gaza, fear is part of their daily lives, the mortar and rocket fire have increased dramatically. one young couple went out to look at the rocket damage to their house and the warning of another attack sent them running. fire also interrupted a funeral of one of three israelis killed yesterday. premature babies had to be moved elsewhere. israelis are ner
on your day-to-day business? >> i'm looking more am i going to continue to grow outside of the u.s. or invest in my facilities in the u.s. in the main, that's still true, but you can't just act like everything is fine when it is not. and i don't know all of the details of his answer, but i can't imagine he said he is acting like nothing is going on out there. >> susie: so you talk about taxes, and taxes are at the center of all of these negotiations. are you open to new taxes? how would that impact your business? >> well, at the end of the day, we all recognize that we need entitlement reform in the country. that's actually the big nut. that's the thing that needs to happen. the only way you're going to get that, though, is by having some kind of tax increase.p4l& >> susie: well, i hope it all works out. thank you so much, david. we really appreciate your time. >> thank you, nice to be here. >> susie: we're speaking with david cote, c.e.o. of honeywell. >> tom: still to come, with the fiscal cliff fast approaching, more companies are offering special dividends with the threat of hi
is the new big task facing barack obama and the u.s. congress. gridlock over the so-called fiscal cliff. what's the fiscal or better put financial cliff? think of it as a high, steep rock. a ledge the u.s. is teetering on and will plunge over if no action is taken on certain financial matters. what are those? one, the bush era tax cuts. in 2001 and 2003, congress, under president george w. bush, lowered everyone's taxes. but it was only temporary, like 11 years temporary. less than two months from now midnight december 31, taxes go back up. the average household will pay more in taxes each year, $2000 to $3500 more. two, sequestration. what's that? new, big budget cuts. $110 billion in cuts in 2013 alone. they go into effect january 2, and will affect the defense budget and the domestic budget. the cbo, says unemployment could climb up over 9%, pushing the u.s. back into recession. why did this happen? an automatic sequestration or permanent set aside of $1.2 trillion was passed by congress, in order to force congress to compromise and figure out how to cut the budget itself. but, a congressi
obama becomes the first u.s. president [indiscernible] pressing for reforms. >> you will not believe the scientific advance that has this dog back on his feet. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. the u.n. secretary-general is among those calling for an immediate end to the violence in gaza. his words come as more than 100 have been killed in the past week of fighting. the majority of them palestinians. palestinian militants have continued firing weapons into israel. in cairo, discussions are ongoing about cease-fire. jeremy our coverage from gaza. >> good morning, gaza. this was the wake-up call sent in by israel. growing up in gaza is not easy. not far away, is the rubble left by the israeli strike on sunday that killed 10 members of this family including four children and two neighbors. they are looking for the remains of a teenage girl missing and presumed dead. this man is a relative of the dead. >> sad, may be strong. >> street are getting tougher, more solid. when they tell the parents of a boy, he will grow up for revenge. >> during the
their love of art and travel is the basis for the kinsey collection, which has visited eight u.s. cities and has been seen by more than 3 million people. we are glad you have joined us. our conversation with bernard and shirley kinsey coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: bernard and shirley kinsey are behind the unique art exhibit. the kinsey collection has been viewed by 3 million people in eight u.s. cities, with more on the way, beginning in 2013. the companion book to the exhibit is called "the kinsey collection." it is an honor to have you both on this program. >> good to be here. tavis: let me start with whether or not in the obama era a door has been at o
the election. u.s. businesses added 171,000 jobs in october across many industries. four days after sandy, the gas crunch in jersey, access to cash in the northeast and controversy nixes sunday's running of the new york city marathon. that and more tonight on "n.b.r.!" we begin with jobs. employers beefed up their payrolls last month, adding more jobs than expected as more americans counted themselves among the labor force. the official labor department count shows 171,000 jobs were created last month. that's much stroer than the 125,000 analysts were looking for. and the government revised its september new job count up to 148,000. thanks to more people looking for work, the unemployment rate rose slightly to 7.9%. darren gersh has the story from washington d.c. >> reporter: the october employment report makes it clear a jobs recovery is solidly underway. >> i think the key message there is that employment growth has been taken up a notch. over the last three months we've added over 170,000 jobs on average. that's a little bit better than what we've been seeing. that is enough over the l
. beyond the u.s. elections, europe also brought fresh worries for investors with concerns in greece, and germany. here's how the numbers stacked up on wall street. the dow lost 312 points, at it's worst point of the day, the blue chip index was down 369 points. the nasdaq tumbled nearly 75 points and the s&p 500 off 33. suzanne pratt takes a look at where the market goes from here. >> reporter: let's be candid. this is not the election outcome that wall street wanted to see. after all many investors believe president obama's tax policies will hurt corporate profits. on top of that there's the likelihood of more regulation in the president's second term. those concerns were evident in selling today of energy, banking and healthcare stocks. a quick look at the price board at the new york stock exchange is a good barometer for the worrywarts out there. wall street veteran teddy weissberg says many investors are just plain upset. >> there was an expectation that we would have some change and a change in the policies. and, i think with obama getting re-elected there are a lot of folks th
that that will plunge the u.s. economy into recession and an unemployment rate back over 9%. >> i'm about in agreement with them. i think there are a few details i'm looking for. i look for the bush tax cuts to expire, the payroll tax holiday to expire, and that tow moo is a 3% cracks of the fiscal budget, and that would, indeed, push, in my analysis, push the u.s. back into recession. >> tom: what's the impact if we go over the cliff but are able to pull ourselves back, say, the first or second week in january. some are saying there are some odds of that happening. we could go over the cliff do see the threat but pull ourselves back. could there be damage done that's irreversible? >> there-- when you think about it, the fiscal cliff is sort of kind of a theoretical thing. the treasury, as we saw last year when we dealt with the debt ceiling crisis. the treasury has been groomed to adjusting so maybe the checks they can't write or the cuts they make might be later in the next few months. it gives them a little bit more time. the bush tax cuts, well, that would happen, but things could be grandfathered
the u.s. election, it doesn't take a genius to figure out what's put investors in a funk. it's all about what's happening 200 miles from wall street. negotiations between the white house and congress are holding equities hostage. >> we are right now pricing in the instability of policymaking. politics are very difficult to forecast. if you think markets are difficult to forecast, try forecasting politics. >> reporter: if discussions are at impasse, stocks sink as they have for the past several days. if progress on the fiscal cliff is constructive, the market gains ground. but, floor broker doreen mogavero thinks today's gain were technical. >> i think honestly people were covering shorts. i don't think it was very euphoric rally where people were saying oh good now we can move on. i think people were saying better not be short going into this weekend in case the come up with a template for a deal before thanksgiving. >> reporter: prior to the election, the s&p 500 was up an impressive 13% for the year. as of today, those gains have been trimmed to just 7%. still, some strategists say the
in the flag of patriotism and corruption against the u.s. and on the taiwan issue and against japan, so the congress has taken place against a backdrop of rising military influence. >> rose:. >> and if i could ask richard on that to me it was a sign of some kind of order in the chinese process, rather than disorder to have this clean handover, the chairman of the military commission of not having jintao hang around for a year or two, it is a modest step of transparency and institutionalization? >> i think you can definitely argue that this basically reflects well on the system, they don't have the former leading hanging on by his fingernails in another important post, that is true. but -- and that is why some people compliment jintao for respecting the process but in ordinary power politics term, it certainly shows that jintao was a much weaker leader than we thought. >> we have never seen foreign policy statements from li keqiang be, scituate. >> we don't know how assertive the military should be. >> rose: reform. >> we don't know, that's what really comes -- and you have one of the be
be hard to believe, but store brands now account for about a fifth of all packaged foods sold in the u.s., and at 70 $billion, we're talking big business. conagra is known for name brands like pam, slim jim, and reddi whip, and it also makes some private label goods. ralcorp is the top manufacturer of growing store brand categories such as cereal and pasta, and it supplies companies like walmart and mcdonald's. together, conagra and ralcorp could become a private label powerhouse. and they might actually make store brand food that's good to eat. >> with this acquisition, what conagra can do that perhaps ralcorp couldn't is they can bring their expertise on the branded side on innovation and r&d, and elevate even more the quality of their products from where they are today. >> reporter: that means more americans are likely to find private label foods more palatable. suzanne pratt, nbr, new york. >> susie: that big conagra deal didn't get much attention on wall street today. investors were more concerned about the debt problems in europe and the fiscal cliff crisis here in the u.s. stocks
the cliff, it can be very bad for markets. >> what about the u.s. economy? dodge the congressional budgetary office says that if we go over in its entirety, $600 billion worth of tax increases and spending cuts, there is no doubt we will go into recession. if it is half a year or the entire year, it will depend on the rest of the world. europe is still in trouble, and emerging markets are slowing and that makes it all the more important washington get their act together. >> can the president pull anything out of the hat? >> he needs to pull something surprising. one of the things in the run-up to the election that was a case to be made for governor romney, investors thought he might be able to shop congress, surprised the situation back into alignment. the president has to bring both sides together and have talked going to an off site meeting somewhere and having a more bipartisan cabinet collected in order to bring unity. but he has to do something surprising. >> this is a self-inflicted wound, isn't it? >> absolutely. the compromises that we made to raise the debt ceiling over a year ago,
and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: tomorrow night on this program, we'll bring you our conversation with frank rich. he takes a critical look of what went wrong for the gop and the prospects of moving forward. that should be a good conversation tomorrow night. tonight, we wanted to start this week with the story that is shaking up washington. the sudden resignation of cia director david petraeus. thomas ricks is a pulitzer prize-winning journalist and a best-selling author. he is a fellow at the center for a new american security. good to have you back on this program. let's get the petraeus stuff at of the way first. i want to go straight to your blog. the sudden departure of general david petraeus from the cia tells us more about the state of our nation than a dozen petraeus. president barack obama should not have accepted his resignation. we seem to care more about the sex lives of our leaders down their re
of diplomacy involving the u.n. secretary general and the secretary general -- and the u.s. secretary of state. from gaza, jeremy bowen reports. a warning, you might find some of these images distressing. >> because i came back to life after the cease-fire began. -- gaza came back to life after the cease-fire began. coming to another israeli bombing campaign felt like another victory. this was the hamas interior ministry. governing with or without a cease-fire will be harder with the main administrative center ron. in jerusalem tonight, is real hint that more military action if the new cease-fire does not hold. >> i know there are citizens expecting a more severe military action, and perhaps we will need to do so but at this time, the right thing for the state of israel is to use this opportunity to achieve a lasting cease-fire. >> an attack on a bus in tel aviv was praised by hamas, but not claimed by them. both sides wanted this deal. all this, and rockets hit in the city from gaza and has dented a sense of security. a ceasefire will not necessarily bring israel could not have kept them from
. on the edge of the square, the clashes began release today. protesters in threw sticks at the u.s. embassy. the police responded with tear gas. hear, the casualty toll is widening. these protesters are furious with the president. many fear he wants to turn the country in to listen now -- into an islamic state. some of them are kids looking for a fight. politicians linked arms. among them, a nobel prizewinner who has called the president and new faro. it turned into one of the biggest demonstrations since the revolution last year. >> the egyptians are not any more afraid of the authority, of the power. they have the courage to declare their desires and their demands and to work and to sacrifice to achieve their demands. >> and barely a year after the last revolution, egyptians are demanding the president should go. and there is no sign when or where this confrontation will end. >> for more on the unrest, i spoke a short time ago with the director and president of the woodrow wilson international center for scholars. she has returned from cairo. you have been there three times, while we're s
to get this economy going. >> woodruff: we have two takes on the battle for the u.s. senate, beginning with the big money being spent in the most competitive races. we talk with npr's tamara keith. >> brown: and from arizona, we have the story of a former surgeon general challenging a six-term congressman for an open seat. >> woodruff: plus on the daily download, margaret warner looks at another way to reach out to voters with last minute messages on twitter. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the losses in life and property kept growing today, in the wake of "sandy". the death toll reached 92 and the focus on physical damage shifted to new jersey, where the monster storm blasted barrier islands and other
of one another. >> we leave you tonight of a thanksgiving day away from home. u.s. troops in afghanistan celebrated the holiday with a game of american football before getting into a traditional turkey dinner. this was a chance to take a well-deserved break. that brings today's program to a close. from all of us here at world is america, thanks for watching. have a happy thanksgiving in the u.s.. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to understand the industry you operate and, working to nurture new ventures and provide capital for key strategic decisions. we offer expertise and tailor solutions in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news" was montreal is home to cirque du soleil. it's also home to the montreal jazz festival and the just for laughs festival. and it's your next vacation destination. through programs like this -- and n
; the shopping frenzy in the u.s. a day early; the lives of native americans and the demand for meat in china. but first, the other news of the day. in syria, rebel fighters gained more momentum in the east today. they seized a key army base at mayadeen and took control of its artillery stockpiles. to the north, syrian government warplanes flattened a building next to a hospital in aleppo overnight. at least 15 people were killed. the airstrikes damaged one of the last remaining sources of medical aid for civilians there. a taliban suicide bomber killed 23 people in a procession of shi-ite muslims in pakistan. the attack happened near midnight when the bomber tried to join a religious gathering in rawalpindi. at least 62 people were wounded, including six policemen. this is the latest in a string of bombings targeting shi-ites during their holiest month of the year. the u.s. ambassador to the u.n. defended her first account of the attack on the consulate in benghazi, libya. susan rice has come under fire by critics who say she gave misleading information about the nature of the attack and the
, on a sunday talk show, of the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. at the time, she said it began as an anti-american protest, but she now says she was working off faulty intelligence. rice met with collins for 90 minutes today, but afterward the senator remained critical. >> i still have many questions that remain unanswered. i continue to be troubled by the fact that the u.n. ambassador decided to play what was essentially a political role at the height of the contentious presidential election campaign by agreeing to go on the sunday shows to present the administration's position. >> sreenivasan: collins stopped short of joining other republican senators who have said they will oppose rice if she is nominated to be secretary of state. later, president obama again defended rice. he called her extraordinary, and cabinet members joined him in applause. a pair of suicide car bombers in syria blew themselves up today in a suburb of damascus. at least 34 people were killed. the twin explosions shattered buildings and left streets littered with rubble. in addition to the dead, the stat
. a u.s. army soldier accused of killing 16 afghan villagers in a drunken rampage in march is facing a preliminary hearing to determine if there is sufficient evidence for a court marshall. the sergeant is accused of leaving his base under cover of darkness and opening fire on civilians in at least two villages. several bombs have gone off in the bahraini capital killing two ex pat yot workers and killing a third. the blast was killed by five home-made devices. the state news agency described the explosions as acts of terrorism. you're watching "bbc world news america." still to come on tonight's program, fighting it out in florida. the u.s. presidential candidates pull out all the stops to win over this state. that's so pivotal with the voters. >> now to the chilling story of a pakistani man and woman arrested on suspicion of killing their teenage daughter with acid. the parents say they feared she would bring dishonor on the family. you may find the details in this report distressing. >> a mother and father in a joining cells. accused of dousing their teenage daughter in acid. her
heats up. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: the u.s. presidential election is just one day away, and that was the hot topic here on wall street. but investors were still cautious about making major moves ahead of the election, so stocks posted just modest gains, and trading volume was light. the dow rose 19 points, the nasdaq added 17, and the s&p up three points. but, where stocks go from here may depend on who wins the white house tomorrow night. suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: wall street is hardly back to normal, with reminders of hurricane sandy still obvious everywhere. but, at least the presidential election could provide a distraction for those coping with the storm's aftermath. the question is will the stock market continue to distract in the days following tomorrow's big contest? that may depend on its outcome. like many on wall street, nyse trader jonathan corpina predicts a mitt romney win will be a big win for stock prices. >> i think when you see new regimes, new presidents come in to play in sort of a turmoil time, that change is always viewed as
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